Pew announces 2011 fellowships

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The Pew Environment Group announced today that four individuals, representing Chile, Mexico and the United States, received a 2011 Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation.

The 2011 Pew Marine Fellowships will support projects to map genetic patterns in dolphin populations, measure the economic and ecological tradeoffs of removing small fish species from the ecosystem, lay the scientific foundation for the establishment of marine protected areas in the Chilean fjord region and analyze the common threads in communities that prioritize environmental conservation.

“We are proud to welcome this exceptionally talented group of ocean conservationists into the Pew Marine Fellowship Program this year,” said Joshua S. Reichert, managing director of the Pew Environment Group. “They’ve each proposed innovative projects that will help foster greater protection for ocean life and habitat in the years ahead.”

The 2011 Pew Fellows in Marine Conservation:

Scott Baker, Ph.D., is an associate director of the Marine Mammal Institute and professor of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. His project will map patterns of isolation and interaction among populations of dolphins in the South Pacific Ocean and identify habitats important to protect for their long-term survival.

Timothy Essington, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. His project will compare the economic value of fisheries that target small, schooling ocean fish and squid to the ecological and economic tradeoffs of removing these important prey species from the food web.

Vreni H